Diabetes Management

/Diabetes Management
Diabetes Management2017-10-15T15:49:46+00:00
Diabetes is a disorder of the sugar metabolism that occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin (the hormone that regulates blood sugar) or/and cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Without the effect of insulin, glucose is accumulated in the body, leading to high glucose levels in the blood, which in turn cause health problems related to diabetes.

There are mainly 2 types of diabetes;

  • Type 1 diabetes is due to an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually appears in people who have one or more genes that make them susceptible to the disease, with or without a family history of type 1 diabetes.
  • Type 2 diabetes is much more common and has several predisposing factors such as genetic causes (family history, increased risk in certain ethnic groups) and environmental conditions (unhealthy diet, obesity, lack of physical activity).

The human body requires, as its main source of fuel or energy, a special sugar called glucose. The body produces glucose from food containing carbohydrates, such as bread, cereals, rice, pasta, potatoes, milk, yoghurt, and fruits. Glucose is carried to the entire body through blood – its level should not be either too high or too low. When glucose exceeds a certain level, part of it must exit the blood and enter the tissues of the body, in order to provide the energy required by cells and ensure the proper function of the body. Part of glucose is stored also in the liver, in order to be used later if needed. When the glucose level falls too much, part of the glucose stored in the liver is released in the blood stream in order to restore it. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a gland located exactly beneath the stomach. Insulin is like a key opening the “gates” of the cells in the body, allowing glucose to pass through the blood to the cells, where it can be used as energy. This procedure is called glucose metabolism. In diabetes, the pancreas either cannot produce insulin, or the insulin produced cannot operate properly. Without the assistance of insulin, the passages of glucose are closed. Glucose is accumulated in the body, leading to high glucose levels in the blood, which in turn cause health problems related to diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is due to an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes usually appears in people who have one or more genes that make them susceptible to the disease, with or without a family history of type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is much more common and has several predisposing factors such as genetic causes (family history, increased risk in certain ethnic groups) and environmental conditions (unhealthy diet, obesity, lack of physical activity).

Typical symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), extreme thirst (polydipsia), dry mouth, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, drowsiness and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly (type 1 diabetes) or gradually (type 2 diabetes). In some cases, type 2 diabetes is asymptomatic and a delayed diagnosis is made only when complications develop.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a gland located exactly beneath the stomach. Insulin is like a key opening the “gates” of the cells in the body, allowing glycose to pass through the blood to the cells, where it can be used as energy. This procedure is called glucose metabolism. In diabetes, the pancreas either cannot produce insulin, or the insulin produced cannot operate properly. Without the assistance of insulin, the passages of glucose are closed. Glucose is accumulated in the body, leading to high glucose levels in the blood, which in turn cause health problems related to diabetes.

There is a pre-diabates stage, and in order to verify whether there this predisposal for diabetes, you must undertake a glucose curve test. A person is considered of having pre-diabetes if the glucose levels in his/her blood are higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose him/her with diabetes.

Firstly, you should visit your physician, in order to prescribe suitable tests that must be conducted, with the purpose of acquiring your complete medical history. Then, the physician shall specify based on the exams the type of the diabetes, in order to administer the proper treatment and nutrition.

Of equal importance are the “self-measurement” and the proper daily management of diabetes by you, in order to regulate your diabetes and avert any complications. Proper self-measurement requires the daily measurement of glucose in your blood and it can be easily and reliably performed using the glucose meters of BIONIME and the meters of the Alfacheck series of KARABINIS MEDICAL.

In general, each glucose meter has its own test strips that you must use. In order to be absolutely sure about the test strips of your meter, you must revert to the instruction manual included in its packaging.

This content is for informational purposes only and it is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.